State of Delaware - Search and Services/Information

Delaware Public Archives

A Brief History Of The Jackson & Sharp Company, Car And Ship Builders, 1863-1950


Endnotes

. “End of Busy Life,” Wilmington Morning News, 24 May 1901, p. 1; “Job H. Jackson Is Dead,” Delaware Gazette and State Journal, 30 May 1901, p. 8.

2 . William T. Kerr, Ideology and Industrialization: Business Response to Social Needs in Late Nineteenth Century Wilmington (master’s thesis, University of Delaware, 1964), 40, 43-44; John A. Munroe, History of Delaware (Newark: University of Delaware Press, 1979), 192; “End of Busy Life”, 2; Edwards, 62-63.

3 . Job H. Jackson, The Path of Success: An Address Delivered in Institute Hall, before the Workingmen of Wilmington, Delaware, March 28th, 1885 (Wilmington: James & Webb Printing Company, 1885), 30. Found at the Historical Society of Delaware (HSD), Wilmington, Delaware.

4 . “Death of Jacob F. Sharp,” Delaware Gazette & State Journal, 9 August 1888, p. 1. The Tatnall Tombstone Collection cites a birth date of 28 April 1818 for Jacob Sharp, yet Sharp’s death certificate lists his age as 73. RG 9020.0, Walter Tatnall Tombstone Collection, p. 314, DPA; RG 1500.3, Vital Statistics, Death Records, 1888, folder 23, DPA.

5 J. Thomas Scharf, History of Delaware, 1609-1888 (Philadelphia: L. J. Richards & Co., 1888; repr., Westminster, Md.: Family Line Publications, 1990), 773; Henry C. Conrad, History of the State of Delaware (Wilmington, 1908), 372; Edward S. Kaminski, American Car & Foundry Company: 1899-1999 (Wilton, CA: Signature Press, 1999), 27. Date of company founding taken from “End of Busy Life,” Wilmington Morning News, 24 May 1901, 1; and RG 2555.11, New Castle County Recorder of Deeds, Deed Book R, Vol. 7, p. 448, 13 April 1863, DPA.

6 . Earl Shinn, “Wilmington and Its Industries: Concluding Paper,” Lippincott’s Magazine, May 1873, 520; Richard Edwards, Industries of Delaware: Historical and Descriptive Review; Cities, Towns, and Business Interests, Institutions, Manufacturing and Commercial Advantages (Wilmington: Richard Edwards, 1880), 62-63; Scharf, 774-775; W. Emerson Wilson, “Firm Put Royalty on Rails,” Evening Journal, May 20, 1968, p. 11. The Shinn article was found at the HSD.

7 . Horace Greeley, Leon Case, et al., The Great Industries of the United States . . . (Hartford: J. B. Burr & Hyde, 1872), 326-328; John White, The American Railroad Passenger Car (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1978), 33.

8 . Carol E. Hoffecker, Wilmington: Portrait of an Industrial City, 1830-1910 (Charlottesville: University Press of Virginia, 1974), 4-20, 25-27.

9 . Ian Arnold, Locomotive, Trolley, and Rail Car Builders; An All-Time Directory
(Los Angeles: Trans-Anglo Books, 1965), 30; Conrad, 372; Richard Urban, The City That Launched a Thousand Ships (Wilmington: Cedar Tree Books, 1999), 60; David B. Tyler, “Shipbuilding in Delaware,” Delaware History 7 (March 1957): 207-216, 213-214; Scharf, 774-775.

10 . “Agreement between Henry L. Hainsworth (Wilmington) and Jackson & Sharp regarding the apprenticeship of John Hainsworth, March 22, 1871,” Hagley Library, Wilmington, Delaware.

11 . Hoffecker, 119-129.

12 . John White, The American Railroad Freight Car: From the Wood-Car Era to the Coming of Steel (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1993). 139; Harold Bell Hancock, “The Industrial Workman Along the Brandywine, 1870-1902,” (Hagley Museum and Library research report: 1958), 48, 63; Joseph D. Weeks, ed., Report on the Statistics of Wages in Manufacturing Industries (Tenth Census, 1884; repr., New York: Norman Ross Publishing, Inc., 1991), 428.

13 . “Jackson and Sharp Company,” The Wilmington Board of Trade Journal 2, Supplement (June 1900): 17.

14 . Hoffecker, 157-159; “End of Busy Life,” 1; Kaminski, 1.

15 . RG 2555.11, New Castle County Recorder of Deeds, Deed Book P, Vol. 18, p. 453-467, 2 May 1901, DPA; “Cars for South America,” The Wilmington Board of Trade Journal 2, no. 3 (June, 1900: 3; memo from H. C. Wick, “Acquisition of Wilmington Plant,” July 9, 1942, American Car and Foundry Collection, Hagley Museum and Library; “Sale of Big Plant: American Car and Foundry Has Bought Jackson & Sharp Company,” The Wilmington Board of Trade Journal 3, no. 2 (May 1901): 1; “Built Cars for a King: Two Elegant Coaches Constructed Here for King Alphonso of Spain” The Wilmington Board of Trade Journal 3, no. 5 (August 1901): 1. The Board of Trade Journal was found in the reference section of the Wilmington Public Library. A listing of the land purchases Jackson & Sharp made between 1870 and 1901 can be found in the 1911 deed of sale to ACF. RG 2555.11, New Castle County Recorder of Deeds, Deed Book E, Vol. 23, p. 485-496, 15 February 1911, DPA.

16 . Jackson & Sharp Company, “A Few Types of Electric Cars” (Wilmington, n.d.)

17 . American Car and Foundry Company, Catalog C (St. Louis; New York: American Car and Foundry Company, 1903), n.p.; David B. Tyler, American Clyde: A History of Iron and Steel Shipbuilding on the Delaware from 1840 to World War I (Newark: University of Delaware Press, 1958), 99; 130n23. Catalog C was found at the Hagley Library.

18 . Carol E. Hoffecker, Corporate Capital: Wilmington in the Twentieth Century (Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 1983), 65-73; American Car and Foundry Company, The American Car and Foundry Company in Khaki: Its Production Achievements in the Great War (American Car and Foundry Company, 1919), 54-57, 64, 92. Found at the Hagley Library, and HSD. Although ACF publications referred to the Jackson & Sharp plant as the Wilmington plant, the Jackson & Sharp name apparently hung above the plant entrance until 1945. Letter from H. C. Wick, “Jackson and Sharp Company,” 7 May 1946 American Car and Foundry Collection, Hagley Library.

19 . Howard Potts, Transcript of oral history interview with Howard Potts, 16 June 1975, Hagley Library, 2.

20 . Potts, 3, 26, 38-39, 305.

21 . Potts, 2, 18-25, 132-133; Hoffecker, Wilmington: Portrait of an Industrial City, 117-118.

22 . Potts, 228-230, 241.

23 . “Wilmington Plant,” American Car and Foundry Collection, Hagley Museum and Library, 15. Conflicting dates on the ending of rail car production are given in Urban, 63; and Kaminski, 27. Urban gave 1925 as the closing date for rail car production; Kaminski, 1931. Photographic evidence suggests that Jackson & Sharp was producing rail cars for export in 1932. RG 9015002.1, Jackson & Sharp Photograph Collection, box 1, folder 3, photo 20.

24 . “Old Woodworking Shop Bows to Modern Steel,” Morning News, 9 April 1938, p. 2. Jackson & Sharp woodworkers also created a wooden version of the Delaware state seal, on display at the DPA.

25 . Commander S. M. Alexander, USN, “Navy Shipbuilding in Wilmington Reviewed” Sunday Star, 5 November 1944, p. 29; American Car and Foundry Company, The Armed Forces of A.C.F. (American Car and Foundry Company, 1945), 65-74; “City Yards Build 824 Navy Craft in 4-Year Period,” Morning News, 28 October 1944, p. 1, 17; William H. Conner and Leon deValinger, Delaware’s Role in World War II (Milford: Public Archives Commission, 1955), 183-184, 227. The Alexander article was found in the “Wilmington—Industries” vertical file in the reference section of the Wilmington Public Library.

26 . “American Car, Foundry Property Is Being Sold,” Journal-Every Evening, 13 June 1952, p. 1; “Wilmington Plant,” American Car and Foundry Collection, Hagley Museum and Library, 16; ACF’s Berwick plant is cited as producing the first Talgo train. Kaminski, 5.

27 . “Drop in Foreign Orders Shuts ACF Plant Here Temporarily,” Journal-Every Evening, 15 February 1950, p. 1,4; “American Car, Foundry Property Is Being Sold,” p. 1; Wilson, p. 11; RG 2555.11, New Castle County Recorder of Deeds, Deed Book B, Vol. 53, p. 193, 16 December 1952.

Previous Page Next Page